Common misconceptions regarding chiropractic

Pictured: not a chiropractor

Pictured: not a chiropractor

Often people that can benefit from chiropractic don't consider care because of false information that they may have heard from a friend, family, or the media. I've heard a number of rather outlandish or downright hilarious (trust me, we don't use crystals to heal people or come at your neck like rambo) claims as to what we do. Below are some of the misconceptions that I've heard most often. 

Myth 1: “Chiropractic can cure ANYTHING!”

Fact 1: Chiropractors are trained to work on problems of the muscles, joints, nerves, and intervertebral discs. Some chiropractors also take further education to provide nutritional and dietary advice for patients, or provide a stronger focus on sports rehabilitation and increased performance. No evidence with the exception of specific case studies indicate that chiropractic can result in the elimination of diseases that afflict an individual. 
 

Myth 2: “Once I go to a chiropractor, I have to go for the rest of my life!”

Fact 2: Not at all true. Active care through chiropractic should empower an individual with education on how they can maintain normal activity. Once the pain processing system is managed, a patient should for the most part be able to keep themselves free of pain. Of course occasional relapse of pain may occur and require treatment. Patients may also make the decision to continue managed care because it makes them feel good and more functional in general.  
 

Myth 3: “The twisting and popping movements are going to hurt me!”

Fact 3: Spinal manipulation is typically the main reason why someone is afraid to use chiropractic care. The reality is that functionally it is incredibly effective, with no risk when your problem is appropriately diagnosed and treatment is performed correctly. There is no risk of causing damage to arterial or nervous tissue when the time is spent to assess what it is that is causing your pain. It is also not typically the only form of treatment that can be administered to relieve someone of their symptoms.